A year ago today...

It was one year ago today that I attempted my first gluten free day. I didn’t know for sure that I had Celiac but with an impending biopsy, the certainty of my doctors and my intense desire to feel better I abstained from my sister’s birthday cake exactly one year ago for the first time. I remember the feeling of uncertainty and the hope that perhaps I didn’t have to do this for the rest of my life. My family had run out to purchase a cacophony of gluten free products in preparation for the birthday meal. We tried many together, some not so bad, some unbelievably terrible.

So as I reflect on one year it’s hard to believe how difficult it truly was to get to this point. The things they didn’t tell you to expect, like a gluten withdraw of insane proportions that leaves you feeling ten times worse then you ever did before. Or the countless conversations with waitstaff trying to explain what you need and that you’re not trying to be a pain on purpose. The skin problems and the joint problems and the anemia. The countless doctor visits that leave you feeling alone and uncertain of anyone’s understanding of this disease.

But those aren’t the things that stand out to me as much as I would think. What stands out is the number of people I’m come across that have gone out of their way to support and help me during this transition. The fact that my mom went gluten free with me every time we went out, during the first few (and most difficult) months. My family in general who scour grocery stores like I do and note any new products that look promising and who show up to walk my dog when I can’t get out of bed.  My sister and law who is normally mild mannered and soft-spoken but goes into mama bear mode when a restaurant has put my health at risk with poor gluten handling measures. My boyfriend who looked at me when my skin crusted over and I couldn’t eat or drink without pain but still told me I was beautiful. And the doctors and team of consummate professionals at the Celiac Center in New York who made me feel like I was understood and able to be helped.

This year has been the hardest I’ve ever had health wise and at times I wasn’t sure how I could keep moving forward. But here I am at the start of a new one and I know so many more people now that are pushing every day to live through this, and countless people that are working in their own way to make it easier for each of us. So no matter where you are in your journey, from exactly 12 months in, I encourage you with this, you are stronger than you ever thought possible and there are legions of us fighting with you and for you. May this year be your best.

Bartacos ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

It was a random Tuesday night when a friend and I decided to search Yelp for a dinner suggestion nearby. Up popped a new restaurant called Bartacos which I pronounced “Bart-a-goes”. It took the random kindness of someone overhearing nearby to correct me and explain the name was actually pronounced “Bar-tacos”. Hmmm, given that this was a taco place, I concurred that her suggestion made much more sense.

Walking in, the restaurant was set up like a modern style home (but much bigger) with an expansive bookshelf, low seating, wall seating and booths all accented by handsome beach décor. I really hoped the food was good because I was already looking forward to frequenting this new found gem.

Once seated, the process was explained. The ordering was much like a sushi bar where you complete your choices on a tiny piece of paper before turning it in. Making my selection took some time because all of the tacos were (or could be modified to be) gluten free. I repeat, I could eat almost anything on the menu!

I settled on a spicy shrimp taco and two mushroom tacos, one traditional and one in a lettuce wrap at our server’s suggestion. They arrived family style, tiny tacos lining our tray, and I didn’t hesitate to dig in. Not only was the presentation perfect, the taste was fantastic. With a great atmosphere, awesome service and tasty little gluten free tacos, this place gets five stars. And by the way, just a tip - it’s pronounced “Bar-tacos” : )

This pic is from my second visit!  

This pic is from my second visit!  

NYC Round 2!

My second trip to New York for "research" was accompanied by my mom. I have never traveled with my mom and in fact, she has never (yes, in their entire marriage of 35+ years) spent as much time away from my dad as she would on this trip. They have done everything together (by choice!) including raising my siblings and then traveling together and even living abroad (possibly to escape my siblings and I, I'm still not sure about that)... So after the first day of getting delayed hours at the airport then trekking our bags through the subway after midnight, then getting lost because one of the connections had been shut down, I was not sure she would be with me for more abuse.. er, um... "Fun" come day 2. But, like the trooper she is, we slept our two hours and were up again to head to the Celiac Center for a "breath test". 

The hardest part about this test was the prep. For 24 hours before, there were no allowable fruits or veggies limiting the one meal I would have to plain white rice with plain salmon. YUM! As for the morning of the test, there would be nothing, not even the water and toothpaste to brush your teeth! 

The test itself simply involved breathing into a small handheld tube (similar to an asthma test) regularly over a period of three hours. That's it! Aside from avoiding boredom and trying to stop your brain from thinking about food, it is a CAKE walk (as you might have guessed, I had trouble not thinking about food!) 

image.jpg

The point of the test is to measure bacteria in your stomach and see if perhaps it has gotten out of whack, causing symptoms that may be consistent with Celiac (bloating, gas, etc. - all the fun stuff!)

I'm still waiting on a call from my doctor to find out exactly what the results showed but the tech administering the test didn't seem to see anything of alarm. And although I should be happy to have "normal" results, as opposed to a gut full of bacteria,  I am not sure what it leaves as an explanation for the continuing symptoms. If you have Celiac and are still having discomfort regularly this may be something to ask your doctor about. It's not difficult, just don't think about food.... Or cake...

Food, it Humbles us All

I write a lot about Celiac because it's so cool and chic. I mean, who wouldn't want this amazing disease? But today I thought we'd venture out into another eating problem that can be debilitating and embarrassing. You or someone you love has probably suffered from it at one time, and the worst part is, you may have not even known! 

That's right, I'm talking about the "food stuck in your teeth" ailment. This affliction is not only debilatating for the individual that suffers but also for everyone around them! Let me paint a scenario for you. There you are with a friend or even worse, a date! The ambience is perfect, the lighting low, the waitstaff attentive to your every need. You look down at your plate that has just arrived, perfectly presented in the flickering candlelight. You grab your silverware and prepare to take the first bite, lifting it to your lips and looking into your companion's eyes but, GAH!!!!! You can't look in your companion's eyes because you are immediately drawn to their teeth. What used to be pearly whites are now pearly whites being massively invaded by flowery green! Or worse, black!

Inside, you panic. The stress is now destroying your once happy meal. You try again with another bite, looking down and hoping that when you raise your eyes once more the situation will have resolved itself. You take your time, pretending you have a need to get the "perfect" bite onto your fork. You slowly, carefully raise your eyes again and, OH GOD!!!! The situation has managed to get worse!

Not to fear, I am here to help you in these times of great distress and have created a three point scale complete with steps of action.  

Scenario 1: Your companion has a small discoloration lodged between their teeth. Perhaps pepper or a similar sized spice. 

Action: DO NOTHING. I assure you, a tiny object will most likely be noticed by your companion and rectified on their next trip to the bathroom. If you attempt to fix this situation at the given table, it will end in multiple gestures of "here, no not there" followed by your desire to reach across the table and use your fingers in your companion's mouth. This is not acceptable. Therefore, I repeat, do nothing.  

Scenario 2: Your companion has a large discoloration lodged between their teeth or perhaps resting comfortably on top of their teeth.  

Action: Kindly and ever so softly as to not draw attention to the entire world whisper, "Oh, looks like you have a little something something" as you point appropriately, to the offending area using your own mouth as a road map. If you do not take some action, when your companion is alerted to the situation themselves either through the person across the room that can make it out, or on their next trip to the bathroom, they will despise you for letting them look like a moron. Understandable.  

Scenario 3: Your companion chose poorly, ordered black bean soup with large chunks of cilantro and now has a mouth that more closely resembles brown m and m's than white chiclets. 

Action: Excuse yourself and wait in bathroom approximately thirty minutes until your companion  finishes eating, gets bored and hopefully (dear God, hopefully) checks their teeth or utilizes a toothpick. 

So, perhaps my suggestions are not perfected but it's nice to know that it's not just us Celiac's making dining out an adventure. Happy eating to us all!