Iron Woman!

A team of doctors has been trying to determine the source of my low iron for years. Iron supplements were too hard on my stomach and until being diagnosed with Celiac, it was always a bigger concern to determine the "why" rather than replenish the "what". 

It was after my level dropped to a five (the hematologist said 50 is what they want to see....hmmm just a tad off), that I was told I needed to begin "iron infusions".

 INTERESTING!!!!

I immediately went to Google! Although there were a ton of medical commentaries, they varied so much I soon was more concerned and less informed than I had hoped. I decided to give up reading others experience and just wait for my own. 

The morning of, I checked into the outpatient cancer ward (which apparently is where they give infusions) around 2pm and took a seat in the lobby, waiting for the call to go back. I'd been told there was a relatively new product that would be infused in around 15 to 20 minutes instead of the alternative, which was a four hour drip! Within twenty minutes or so, a friendly nurse called my name and I followed her (since running away would now be quite obvious). She helped me get settled in a comfy recliner and brought me a thin blanket while I signed forms acknowledging the pages and pages of risks. A half dozen humans were lounging in chairs around me, hooked up to i.v.'s and in varying states of health. The woman closest to me had thinning hair and alternated between hiding under her blanket and sleeping with headphones. It made me realize something very important.

What I was about to endure was going to be ok. It had been easy to focus on all the pain, the hunger, the general frustration of Celiac and fear of this new procedure until I entered that room full of cases seemingly much more life threatening than mine. Don't get me wrong, Celiac can be dangerous if you don't adjust your life, my doctor had been very clear about that. But cancer is a whole different animal and my reality paled in comparison.

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The infusion itself consisted of an i.v. - first a saline drip, then a bag of steroids to assist with reactions, then the iron, more flushing with saline and finally an observation period. Start to finish, around three hours. And I did have some reactions for about 48-72 hours including headaches, stomach pain and severe flushing accompanied by hot flashes. It wasn't a picnic. But at the end of that period, things slowly subsided. I still had skin problems and headaches and stomach frustrations. I still have Celiac after all. But just like when I looked around that room and saw the group of patients next to me, I found a way to be grateful.